Category Archives: stem education

“The biggest challenge facing education is teaching for a future that is unknown.” – Ben Eilenberg, Australia

Benjamin Eilenberg
Teacher/STEM Coordinator/Media Coordinator
Silverton Primary School
Victoria, Australia
@ben_eilenberg

Ben Eilenberg may have come from a teaching family (his father was a lecturer, his mother a speech pathologist, and his sisters are secondary teachers), but he wasn’t prepared for what he experienced at one of his first teaching jobs.

“I walked in to a school that had only one computer per classroom and that was it, no other technological resources available,” Eilenberg recalls. “It made me think about what the students were missing out on, and how this is preparing them for the future.… Visit the author's original post

“Ultimately, I want kids to pursue life goals based on passions they encountered in school – similar to my school experience.” – Brian Aspinall, Canada

When we first spoke with Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert Brian Aspinall last year, he shared his passion for helping his students solve problems systematically, all with the help of computer science and STEM.

While Aspinall’s a veteran of using technology in his classroom – Minecraft and coding have been part of his teaching toolbox for years – he has never viewed it as a silver bullet for education transformation. Aspinall’s popular blog shares that philosophy, as well as his perspective on assessment, professional development, coding and 1:1 learning environments.… Visit the author's original post

Call for Papers for International STEM Day @NSTA National Conference 2016

NSTA Logo

Call for International Papers in STEM Education for NSTA National Conference 2016

Theme: Science Goes Global: The Next Generation

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), founded in 1944 and headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, is the largest organization in the world committed to promoting excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning for all. NSTA’s current membership of 55,000 includes science teachers, science supervisors, administrators, scientists, business and industry representatives, and others involved in and committed to science education.

NSTA’s Guiding PrinciplesSanAntonioElemSciDay

  • Model excellence;
  • Champion science literacy;
  • Value scientific excellence;
  • Embrace diversity, equity, and respect;
  • Enhance teaching and learning through research;
  • Collaborate with partners; and
  • Exemplify a dynamic professional organization.
Visit the author's original post

Call for Papers for International STEM Day @NSTA National Conference 2016

NSTA Logo

Call for International Papers in STEM Education for NSTA National Conference 2016

Theme: Science Goes Global: The Next Generation

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), founded in 1944 and headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, is the largest organization in the world committed to promoting excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning for all. NSTA’s current membership of 55,000 includes science teachers, science supervisors, administrators, scientists, business and industry representatives, and others involved in and committed to science education.

NSTA’s Guiding PrinciplesSanAntonioElemSciDay

  • Model excellence;
  • Champion science literacy;
  • Value scientific excellence;
  • Embrace diversity, equity, and respect;
  • Enhance teaching and learning through research;
  • Collaborate with partners; and
  • Exemplify a dynamic professional organization.
Visit the author's original post

Doug Bergman: Changing of the Nerd

by Doug Bergman
Expert Educator Columnist, USA

Finally being a nerd is cool. Being a nerd is marketable, profitable, and even sexy.

There was a time where access to electronic and digital tools was just not possible. There was a time where obtaining information was not something you or I could reasonably do; the cost of gadgets and digital equipment was so high that only elite scientists and large corporations could afford it. The world of science, research, and discovery was just not possible for the layman.… Visit the author's original post