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Colored by Numbers Learning

All of us have at some point completed a color by numbers activity, a simple activity of creating a product by following a guide.  Simply doing what you are told.  You would think that if a hundred people looked at the same picture that you get a hundred people seeing the exact same thing, but you would be wrong.  Colors are a perception of our minds.  The cones in our retinas are picking up wavelengths being reflected back towards us from an object.Visit the author's original post

Teaching: It’s a Great Gig!!

             I am sure all teachers at some point have heard this from non-teachers about our profession.  I have recently been thinking about whether I want to make teaching my career or if it is time to move on and when I would talk with non-teachers about it their response was it’s a great gig why leave followed by these typical responses:

                                           You only work 10 months a year

                                           You are done at 3:00 every day

                                           You have tenure, you can’t be fired

                                           You get a great pension 

              While these are partially true, they shouldn’t be the reason I get up and go to school each day and I believe those four words, “It’s a great gig”, are part of the problem in education.
Visit the author's original post

Teaching: It’s a Great Gig!!

             I am sure all teachers at some point have heard this from non-teachers about our profession.  I have recently been thinking about whether I want to make teaching my career or if it is time to move on and when I would talk with non-teachers about it their response was it’s a great gig why leave followed by these typical responses:

                                           You only work 10 months a year

                                           You are done at 3:00 every day

                                           You have tenure, you can’t be fired

                                           You get a great pension 

              While these are partially true, they shouldn’t be the reason I get up and go to school each day and I believe those four words, “It’s a great gig”, are part of the problem in education.
Visit the author's original post

Teachers: Why we are here


                With all of the drama going on with the education system it is easy to forget why we walk through our door every morning.  The new Common Core has many educators up in arms and here in New York State many teachers are upset over our Governor’s handling of the schools, but this should not influence any good teacher.  All teachers have a required curriculum they must follow, so what if it has changed to the Common Core.  You take the new standards that are given to you and teach them with your own twist.  My administrators are now coming in more often for observations, but if you are a good teacher why does it matter.  At the end of the day, it’s not the evaluations and what you teach, but whom you teach that matters. 
            Last week while working on a project, a student made a video about the impact of using games in the classroom.  He stated how the game has given him confidence in the class and has opened a line of communication up between him, his peers, the faculty and administration.  This student has transformed from a class disruption that was in the principal’s office on a daily basis to now going to the principal’s office on a regular basis to discuss what we are doing in class (he has also had no behavior issues this year).    This student was truly genuine in his video.  You could see how a simple game has totally changed his outlook on school.  This really made me think of why I come to school.  To help my students become better people.  It doesn't take much to make an impact.  Open your ears and listen to your students.  My students state how using games helps them, so we mix gaming into the curriculum.  Academic and social gains are seen when you teach to your kids, not a curriculum or administrator.  So remember, you walk through your door to engage those young minds in your classroom.
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February 26th, 2015

Why We Are Here

            With all of the drama going on with the education system it is easy to forget why we walk through our door every morning.  The new Common Core has many educators up in arms and here in New York State many teachers are upset over our Governor’s handling of the schools, but this should not influence any good teacher.  All teachers have a required curriculum they must follow, so what if it has changed to the Common Core.  You take the new standards that are given to you and teach them with your own twist.  My administrators are now coming in more often for observations, but if you are a good teacher why does it matter.  At the end of the day, it’s not the evaluations and what you teach, but whom you teach that matters.  Last week while working on a project, a student made a video about the impact of using games in the classroom.  He stated how the game has given him confidence in the class and has opened a line of communication up between him, his peers, the faculty and administration.  This student has transformed from a class disruption that was in the principal’s office a daily basis to now going to the principal’s office on a regular basis to discuss what we are doing in class (he has also had to no behavior issues this year).    This student was truly genuine in his video.  You could see how a simple game has totally changed his outlook on school.  This really made me think of why I come to school.  To help my students become better people.  It doesn’t take much to make an impact.  Open your ears and listen to your students.  My students state how using games helps them, so we mix gaming into the curriculum.  Academic and social gains are seen when you teach to your kids, not a curriculum or administrator.  So remember, you walk through your door to engage those young minds in your classroom.… Visit the author's original post